PERT Reading Practice Test

Try our free PERT Reading practice test. The PERT Reading test focuses on reading comprehension skills for both fiction and non-fiction. You will need to identity the author’s purpose, summarize important ideas, determine the meaning of words in context, and distinguish between facts and opinions. This test includes 30 questions and there is no time limit. Be sure to read each passage very carefully.

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Question 1

Mary Jackson

In the 1950s, Mary Jackson became the first black woman to work as a human computer for NASA’s space program. Jackson’s job was to develop the mathematical equations needed for getting US spaceships into outer space and returning them safely home. The road to success was not smooth for Jackson. The fields of mathematics and space technology were still dominated by white men, and it took great determination for Jackson to move from lower-level jobs to the position of human computer.

Jackson's interest in becoming an engineer grew during her time as a human computer. She solved difficult problems concerning the aerodynamics of aircraft. Kazimierz Czarnecki, the engineer overseeing Jackson’s work, was so impressed by her mathematical abilities that he asked Jackson to work closely with the engineers. From there, Jackson’s dream of working with spaceships only grew. Unfortunately, no engineering schools were willing to let an African American into their graduate programs, let alone a woman.

With the encouragement of Kazimierz Czarnecki, Jackson fought for her right to attend classes through the legal system. She petitioned to the city of Hampton, Virginia for permission to take night classes at an all-white high school. She argued that America needed all the help it could get to win the space race against the Russians. In the end, the city sided with Jackson, and she dove deep into her education.

Jackson studied hard while continuing to work full time. Thanks to her unrelenting drive, Jackson became the first black woman in the US to graduate with an engineering degree in 1958. She spent the next 34 years specializing in aerodynamics at NASA, eventually becoming agency’s most senior engineer. At the end of her career, Jackson dedicated herself to working as an equal opportunity specialist, helping other women and people of color achieve their dreams in the fields of science and mathematics.
 
As it is used in the passage, the word “fields” means:

A
Subjects of study and expertise
B
Large, open expanses NASA used for launching spacecraft
C
Arenas where Jackson competed as a student athlete in Hampton, VA
D
Geometric planes used to create scientific and mathematical diagrams
Question 1 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). The passage mentions the “fields of mathematics and space technology,” referring to the body of knowledge of those two subjects. The word is used figuratively, not referring to literal, wide open spaces as mentioned in choices (B), (C), and (D).
Question 2

Mary Jackson

In the 1950s, Mary Jackson became the first black woman to work as a human computer for NASA’s space program. Jackson’s job was to develop the mathematical equations needed for getting US spaceships into outer space and returning them safely home. The road to success was not smooth for Jackson. The fields of mathematics and space technology were still dominated by white men, and it took great determination for Jackson to move from lower-level jobs to the position of human computer.

Jackson's interest in becoming an engineer grew during her time as a human computer. She solved difficult problems concerning the aerodynamics of aircraft. Kazimierz Czarnecki, the engineer overseeing Jackson’s work, was so impressed by her mathematical abilities that he asked Jackson to work closely with the engineers. From there, Jackson’s dream of working with spaceships only grew. Unfortunately, no engineering schools were willing to let an African American into their graduate programs, let alone a woman.

With the encouragement of Kazimierz Czarnecki, Jackson fought for her right to attend classes through the legal system. She petitioned to the city of Hampton, Virginia for permission to take night classes at an all-white high school. She argued that America needed all the help it could get to win the space race against the Russians. In the end, the city sided with Jackson, and she dove deep into her education.

Jackson studied hard while continuing to work full time. Thanks to her unrelenting drive, Jackson became the first black woman in the US to graduate with an engineering degree in 1958. She spent the next 34 years specializing in aerodynamics at NASA, eventually becoming agency’s most senior engineer. At the end of her career, Jackson dedicated herself to working as an equal opportunity specialist, helping other women and people of color achieve their dreams in the fields of science and mathematics.
 
The main purpose of this passage is:

A
To argue that more women and people of color should be represented in science and mathematics
B
To briefly summarize the accomplishments of an influential figure in 20th century history
C
To emphasize the role of Hampton, Virginia's education system in Mary Jackson's success
D
To highlight the tensions between the United States and the Soviet Union during the "space race" of the 1950s
Question 2 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The passage broadly summarizes Mary Jackson’s career accomplishments. Answer (A) is incorrect because the selection is not structured as an argumentative essay, while (C) and (D) are incorrect because the selection only mentions Hampton, Virginia and the space race; it does not focus on those topics extensively.
Question 3

Mary Jackson

In the 1950s, Mary Jackson became the first black woman to work as a human computer for NASA’s space program. Jackson’s job was to develop the mathematical equations needed for getting US spaceships into outer space and returning them safely home. The road to success was not smooth for Jackson. The fields of mathematics and space technology were still dominated by white men, and it took great determination for Jackson to move from lower-level jobs to the position of human computer.

Jackson's interest in becoming an engineer grew during her time as a human computer. She solved difficult problems concerning the aerodynamics of aircraft. Kazimierz Czarnecki, the engineer overseeing Jackson’s work, was so impressed by her mathematical abilities that he asked Jackson to work closely with the engineers. From there, Jackson’s dream of working with spaceships only grew. Unfortunately, no engineering schools were willing to let an African American into their graduate programs, let alone a woman.

With the encouragement of Kazimierz Czarnecki, Jackson fought for her right to attend classes through the legal system. She petitioned to the city of Hampton, Virginia for permission to take night classes at an all-white high school. She argued that America needed all the help it could get to win the space race against the Russians. In the end, the city sided with Jackson, and she dove deep into her education.

Jackson studied hard while continuing to work full time. Thanks to her unrelenting drive, Jackson became the first black woman in the US to graduate with an engineering degree in 1958. She spent the next 34 years specializing in aerodynamics at NASA, eventually becoming agency’s most senior engineer. At the end of her career, Jackson dedicated herself to working as an equal opportunity specialist, helping other women and people of color achieve their dreams in the fields of science and mathematics.
 
Based on the information in the passage, which of the following tasks would a human computer most likely perform?

A
Tracking the budgets of government agencies and groups like NASA
B
Designing aircraft to use storage space as efficiently as possible
C
Calculating the number of aircraft the United States would need to build to outpace the space programs of other countries
D
Determining how much fuel an aircraft would need to leave the Earth's atmosphere
Question 3 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). The selection states that Jackson’s job as a human computer was to “develop the mathematical equations needed for getting US spaceships into outer space and returning them safely home.” One can infer that knowing how much fuel an aircraft needs would be a vital part of such equations. The other answer choices may mention issues that were significant at the time, but only (D) is closely related to the description of Jackson’s job.
Question 4

Mary Jackson

In the 1950s, Mary Jackson became the first black woman to work as a human computer for NASA’s space program. Jackson’s job was to develop the mathematical equations needed for getting US spaceships into outer space and returning them safely home. The road to success was not smooth for Jackson. The fields of mathematics and space technology were still dominated by white men, and it took great determination for Jackson to move from lower-level jobs to the position of human computer.

Jackson's interest in becoming an engineer grew during her time as a human computer. She solved difficult problems concerning the aerodynamics of aircraft. Kazimierz Czarnecki, the engineer overseeing Jackson’s work, was so impressed by her mathematical abilities that he asked Jackson to work closely with the engineers. From there, Jackson’s dream of working with spaceships only grew. Unfortunately, no engineering schools were willing to let an African American into their graduate programs, let alone a woman.

With the encouragement of Kazimierz Czarnecki, Jackson fought for her right to attend classes through the legal system. She petitioned to the city of Hampton, Virginia for permission to take night classes at an all-white high school. She argued that America needed all the help it could get to win the space race against the Russians. In the end, the city sided with Jackson, and she dove deep into her education.

Jackson studied hard while continuing to work full time. Thanks to her unrelenting drive, Jackson became the first black woman in the US to graduate with an engineering degree in 1958. She spent the next 34 years specializing in aerodynamics at NASA, eventually becoming agency’s most senior engineer. At the end of her career, Jackson dedicated herself to working as an equal opportunity specialist, helping other women and people of color achieve their dreams in the fields of science and mathematics.
 
Which was a major obstacle to Mary Jackson's goal of working with spacecraft?

A
NASA had already hired too many engineers, so Jackson's help was unneeded.
B
At the time, it was against the law for black women to attend universities.
C
Engineering schools did not want to admit women or people of color as students.
D
Her supervisor, Kazimierz Czarnecki, did not believe Jackson should work with engineers.
Question 4 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). Answers (A) and (B) are simply false. Answer (D) is incorrect because Kazimierz thought it was a promising idea for Jackson to work with engineers.
Question 5

Mary Jackson

In the 1950s, Mary Jackson became the first black woman to work as a human computer for NASA’s space program. Jackson’s job was to develop the mathematical equations needed for getting US spaceships into outer space and returning them safely home. The road to success was not smooth for Jackson. The fields of mathematics and space technology were still dominated by white men, and it took great determination for Jackson to move from lower-level jobs to the position of human computer.

Jackson's interest in becoming an engineer grew during her time as a human computer. She solved difficult problems concerning the aerodynamics of aircraft. Kazimierz Czarnecki, the engineer overseeing Jackson’s work, was so impressed by her mathematical abilities that he asked Jackson to work closely with the engineers. From there, Jackson’s dream of working with spaceships only grew. Unfortunately, no engineering schools were willing to let an African American into their graduate programs, let alone a woman.

With the encouragement of Kazimierz Czarnecki, Jackson fought for her right to attend classes through the legal system. She petitioned to the city of Hampton, Virginia for permission to take night classes at an all-white high school. She argued that America needed all the help it could get to win the space race against the Russians. In the end, the city sided with Jackson, and she dove deep into her education.

Jackson studied hard while continuing to work full time. Thanks to her unrelenting drive, Jackson became the first black woman in the US to graduate with an engineering degree in 1958. She spent the next 34 years specializing in aerodynamics at NASA, eventually becoming agency’s most senior engineer. At the end of her career, Jackson dedicated herself to working as an equal opportunity specialist, helping other women and people of color achieve their dreams in the fields of science and mathematics.
 
According to the passage, how did Jackson convince the city of Hampton to allow her to take night classes at the all-white high school?

A
By arguing that it was unlawful for them to discriminate against her solely because she was an African-American woman.
B
She didn’t; her overseer Kazimierz Czarnecki was the one to petition the city on her behalf.
C
By stating that the more educated engineers NASA had, the more likely they were to beat Russia to space.
D
By demonstrating her drive and commitment to furthering her education in mathematics, science, and technology.
Question 5 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The passage states that “She argued that America needed all the help it could get to win the space race against the Russians.” Answer (B) is simply false. The paragraph about Jackson’s legal battle makes no mention of the arguments described in (A) or (C).
Question 6

A Great Soul

Born in 1869, Mohandas Gandhi grew up while India was still under British colonial rule, witnessing great injustice against his fellow Indians. In 1888, he sailed to England to study law, even though he ultimately intended to become a doctor. After Gandhi finished school, he went to South Africa, where he worked as a lawyer and civil rights activist. In both England and South Africa, Gandhi encountered incredible discrimination by white people against Indians and other people of color. He was even kicked off a train in South Africa — despite having a first-class ticket — because a white man didn’t like seeing an Indian in the first-class section. After such experiences, Gandhi dedicated the rest of his life to fighting injustice.

In 1921, Gandhi took charge of the Indian National Congress, a group of thirteen men in the Indian government who fought discrimination and unfair taxation against farmers and urban laborers. Using the nonviolent tactic of civil disobedience, Gandhi and his followers resisted British control over Indian life, choosing not to follow unfair, discriminatory laws and policies. The British responded to this resistance by strengthening their military presence in India, often at the cost of human lives. Gandhi was eventually imprisoned in 1942 for his “radical” beliefs, but he refused to recognize violence as a means of fighting the British. He gained international attention for his hunger strikes, refusing to eat until the British changed their unjust policies.

Gandhi became known as Mahatma, a Sanskrit word meaning “Great Soul.” His teachings of nonviolence echoed around the world, and the British faced growing pressure from other nations to grant India independence, which they finally did, five years after Gandhi’s imprisonment. Gandhi’s lifetime commitment to peace, nonviolence, and justice remains an inspiration to us all.
 
Which event came first?

A
Gandhi was imprisoned by the British.
B
Gandhi became leader of the Indian National Congress.
C
Gandhi studied law in England.
D
India gained independence from the British.
Question 6 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). Gandhi left India for England, and from there he went to South Africa before returning to India.
Question 7

A Great Soul

Born in 1869, Mohandas Gandhi grew up while India was still under British colonial rule, witnessing great injustice against his fellow Indians. In 1888, he sailed to England to study law, even though he ultimately intended to become a doctor. After Gandhi finished school, he went to South Africa, where he worked as a lawyer and civil rights activist. In both England and South Africa, Gandhi encountered incredible discrimination by white people against Indians and other people of color. He was even kicked off a train in South Africa — despite having a first-class ticket — because a white man didn’t like seeing an Indian in the first-class section. After such experiences, Gandhi dedicated the rest of his life to fighting injustice.

In 1921, Gandhi took charge of the Indian National Congress, a group of thirteen men in the Indian government who fought discrimination and unfair taxation against farmers and urban laborers. Using the nonviolent tactic of civil disobedience, Gandhi and his followers resisted British control over Indian life, choosing not to follow unfair, discriminatory laws and policies. The British responded to this resistance by strengthening their military presence in India, often at the cost of human lives. Gandhi was eventually imprisoned in 1942 for his “radical” beliefs, but he refused to recognize violence as a means of fighting the British. He gained international attention for his hunger strikes, refusing to eat until the British changed their unjust policies.

Gandhi became known as Mahatma, a Sanskrit word meaning “Great Soul.” His teachings of nonviolence echoed around the world, and the British faced growing pressure from other nations to grant India independence, which they finally did, five years after Gandhi’s imprisonment. Gandhi’s lifetime commitment to peace, nonviolence, and justice remains an inspiration to us all.
 
As it used in the passage, the word radical most nearly means:

A
Fascinating
B
Alarming
C
Unfair
D
Defiant
Question 7 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). Throughout his life, Gandhi stood up to the British government, defying them and refusing to accept their authority over India, which got him imprisoned.
Question 8

A Great Soul

Born in 1869, Mohandas Gandhi grew up while India was still under British colonial rule, witnessing great injustice against his fellow Indians. In 1888, he sailed to England to study law, even though he ultimately intended to become a doctor. After Gandhi finished school, he went to South Africa, where he worked as a lawyer and civil rights activist. In both England and South Africa, Gandhi encountered incredible discrimination by white people against Indians and other people of color. He was even kicked off a train in South Africa — despite having a first-class ticket — because a white man didn’t like seeing an Indian in the first-class section. After such experiences, Gandhi dedicated the rest of his life to fighting injustice.

In 1921, Gandhi took charge of the Indian National Congress, a group of thirteen men in the Indian government who fought discrimination and unfair taxation against farmers and urban laborers. Using the nonviolent tactic of civil disobedience, Gandhi and his followers resisted British control over Indian life, choosing not to follow unfair, discriminatory laws and policies. The British responded to this resistance by strengthening their military presence in India, often at the cost of human lives. Gandhi was eventually imprisoned in 1942 for his “radical” beliefs, but he refused to recognize violence as a means of fighting the British. He gained international attention for his hunger strikes, refusing to eat until the British changed their unjust policies.

Gandhi became known as Mahatma, a Sanskrit word meaning “Great Soul.” His teachings of nonviolence echoed around the world, and the British faced growing pressure from other nations to grant India independence, which they finally did, five years after Gandhi’s imprisonment. Gandhi’s lifetime commitment to peace, nonviolence, and justice remains an inspiration to us all.
 
When did the British grant India independence?

A
1921
B
1942
C
1947
D
1950
Question 8 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). This question requires a bit of inference. The passage states that “the British faced growing pressure from other nations to grant India independence, which they finally did, five years after Gandhi’s imprisonment.” Gandhi was imprisoned in 1942, so 1947 came five years later.
Question 9

A Great Soul

Born in 1869, Mohandas Gandhi grew up while India was still under British colonial rule, witnessing great injustice against his fellow Indians. In 1888, he sailed to England to study law, even though he ultimately intended to become a doctor. After Gandhi finished school, he went to South Africa, where he worked as a lawyer and civil rights activist. In both England and South Africa, Gandhi encountered incredible discrimination by white people against Indians and other people of color. He was even kicked off a train in South Africa — despite having a first-class ticket — because a white man didn’t like seeing an Indian in the first-class section. After such experiences, Gandhi dedicated the rest of his life to fighting injustice.

In 1921, Gandhi took charge of the Indian National Congress, a group of thirteen men in the Indian government who fought discrimination and unfair taxation against farmers and urban laborers. Using the nonviolent tactic of civil disobedience, Gandhi and his followers resisted British control over Indian life, choosing not to follow unfair, discriminatory laws and policies. The British responded to this resistance by strengthening their military presence in India, often at the cost of human lives. Gandhi was eventually imprisoned in 1942 for his “radical” beliefs, but he refused to recognize violence as a means of fighting the British. He gained international attention for his hunger strikes, refusing to eat until the British changed their unjust policies.

Gandhi became known as Mahatma, a Sanskrit word meaning “Great Soul.” His teachings of nonviolence echoed around the world, and the British faced growing pressure from other nations to grant India independence, which they finally did, five years after Gandhi’s imprisonment. Gandhi’s lifetime commitment to peace, nonviolence, and justice remains an inspiration to us all.
 
Based on the selection, which of the following actions would be an example of “civil disobedience”?

A
People refusing to pay a tax they found unfair
B
Lying under oath in a court of law
C
Writing an angry letter to the newspaper
D
Voting for an unpopular presidential candidate
Question 9 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). The selection tells us that “Using the nonviolent tactic of civil disobedience, Gandhi and his followers resisted British control over Indian life, choosing not to follow unfair, discriminatory laws and policies.” Answer (A) is the only option involving refusal to obey a law or policy.
Question 10

A Great Soul

Born in 1869, Mohandas Gandhi grew up while India was still under British colonial rule, witnessing great injustice against his fellow Indians. In 1888, he sailed to England to study law, even though he ultimately intended to become a doctor. After Gandhi finished school, he went to South Africa, where he worked as a lawyer and civil rights activist. In both England and South Africa, Gandhi encountered incredible discrimination by white people against Indians and other people of color. He was even kicked off a train in South Africa — despite having a first-class ticket — because a white man didn’t like seeing an Indian in the first-class section. After such experiences, Gandhi dedicated the rest of his life to fighting injustice.

In 1921, Gandhi took charge of the Indian National Congress, a group of thirteen men in the Indian government who fought discrimination and unfair taxation against farmers and urban laborers. Using the nonviolent tactic of civil disobedience, Gandhi and his followers resisted British control over Indian life, choosing not to follow unfair, discriminatory laws and policies. The British responded to this resistance by strengthening their military presence in India, often at the cost of human lives. Gandhi was eventually imprisoned in 1942 for his “radical” beliefs, but he refused to recognize violence as a means of fighting the British. He gained international attention for his hunger strikes, refusing to eat until the British changed their unjust policies.

Gandhi became known as Mahatma, a Sanskrit word meaning “Great Soul.” His teachings of nonviolence echoed around the world, and the British faced growing pressure from other nations to grant India independence, which they finally did, five years after Gandhi’s imprisonment. Gandhi’s lifetime commitment to peace, nonviolence, and justice remains an inspiration to us all.
 
Which sentence states an opinion?

A
“In both England and South Africa, Gandhi encountered incredible discrimination by white people against Indians and other people of color.”
B
“He gained international attention for his hunger strikes, refusing to eat until the British changed their unjust policies.”
C
“Gandhi became known as Mahatma, a Sanskrit word meaning “Great Soul.”
D
“Gandhi’s lifetime commitment to peace, nonviolence, and justice remains an inspiration to us all.”
Question 10 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). In this sentence the author describes Gandhi as “an inspiration,” which is a personal response to the story (the personal pronoun “us” is a clue). Answers (B) and (C) describe facts, and answer (A) makes a statement of fact that is supported by the sentences immediately following it.
Question 11

The Most Dangerous Game

“Off there to the right — somewhere — is a large island,” said Whitney. “It's rather a mystery —”

“What island is it?” Rainsford asked.

“The old charts call it ‘Ship-Trap Island’,” Whitney replied. “A suggestive name, isn't it? Sailors have a curious dread of the place. I don't know why. Some superstition —”

“Can't see it,” remarked Rainsford, trying to peer through the dank tropical night that was palpable as it pressed its thick warm blackness in upon the yacht.

“You've good eyes,” said Whitney, with a laugh, “and I've seen you pick off a moose moving in the brown fall bush at four hundred yards, but even you can't see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”

“Nor four yards,” admitted Rainsford. “Ugh! It's like moist black velvet.”

“It will be light enough in Rio,” promised Whitney. “We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting.”

“The best sport in the world,” agreed Rainsford.

“For the hunter,” amended Whitney. “Not for the jaguar.”

“Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. “You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?”

“Perhaps the jaguar does,” observed Whitney.

“Bah! They've no understanding.”

“Even so, I rather think they understand one thing — fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death.”

“Nonsense,” laughed Rainsford. “This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes — the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are hunters.”
 
What is implied by the first sentence of the passage?

A
Whitney has been to the island before
B
Whitney has strong navigation skills
C
Whitney is more intelligent than Rainsford
D
Whitney has heard about the island, but not been there
Question 11 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). Whitney calls the large island a “mystery,” and says it is out there “somewhere.” These words indicate he has not personally been to the island, but has heard about it. Nothing about his navigation skills or intelligence is strongly implied in this first line.
Question 12

The Most Dangerous Game

“Off there to the right — somewhere — is a large island,” said Whitney. “It's rather a mystery —”

“What island is it?” Rainsford asked.

“The old charts call it ‘Ship-Trap Island’,” Whitney replied. “A suggestive name, isn't it? Sailors have a curious dread of the place. I don't know why. Some superstition —”

“Can't see it,” remarked Rainsford, trying to peer through the dank tropical night that was palpable as it pressed its thick warm blackness in upon the yacht.

“You've good eyes,” said Whitney, with a laugh, “and I've seen you pick off a moose moving in the brown fall bush at four hundred yards, but even you can't see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”

“Nor four yards,” admitted Rainsford. “Ugh! It's like moist black velvet.”

“It will be light enough in Rio,” promised Whitney. “We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting.”

“The best sport in the world,” agreed Rainsford.

“For the hunter,” amended Whitney. “Not for the jaguar.”

“Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. “You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?”

“Perhaps the jaguar does,” observed Whitney.

“Bah! They've no understanding.”

“Even so, I rather think they understand one thing — fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death.”

“Nonsense,” laughed Rainsford. “This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes — the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are hunters.”
 
What is the setting for the story?

A
A chilly night in the Amazon rainforest
B
A sweltering afternoon on the Amazon River
C
A humid night on the Caribbean Sea
D
A damp night in Rio de Janeiro
Question 12 Explanation: 
The correct choice is (C ). The setting is very clearly established when Whitney tells Rainsford, “...even you can’t see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”
Question 13

The Most Dangerous Game

“Off there to the right — somewhere — is a large island,” said Whitney. “It's rather a mystery —”

“What island is it?” Rainsford asked.

“The old charts call it ‘Ship-Trap Island’,” Whitney replied. “A suggestive name, isn't it? Sailors have a curious dread of the place. I don't know why. Some superstition —”

“Can't see it,” remarked Rainsford, trying to peer through the dank tropical night that was palpable as it pressed its thick warm blackness in upon the yacht.

“You've good eyes,” said Whitney, with a laugh, “and I've seen you pick off a moose moving in the brown fall bush at four hundred yards, but even you can't see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”

“Nor four yards,” admitted Rainsford. “Ugh! It's like moist black velvet.”

“It will be light enough in Rio,” promised Whitney. “We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting.”

“The best sport in the world,” agreed Rainsford.

“For the hunter,” amended Whitney. “Not for the jaguar.”

“Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. “You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?”

“Perhaps the jaguar does,” observed Whitney.

“Bah! They've no understanding.”

“Even so, I rather think they understand one thing — fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death.”

“Nonsense,” laughed Rainsford. “This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes — the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are hunters.”
 
Read this sentence from the passage:

“You've good eyes,” said Whitney, with a laugh, “and I've seen you pick off a moose moving in the brown fall bush at four hundred yards, but even you can't see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”
 
The author uses this underlined statement to show that:

A
Whitney and Rainsford have hunted together in the past
B
Rainsford is a lucky shot
C
Whitney idolizes Rainsford
D
Rainsford is a ruthless hunter
Question 13 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). The author uses this statement to show that Rainsford is an expert marksman and to show that Rainsford and Whitney have hunted together in the past.
Question 14

The Most Dangerous Game

“Off there to the right — somewhere — is a large island,” said Whitney. “It's rather a mystery —”

“What island is it?” Rainsford asked.

“The old charts call it ‘Ship-Trap Island’,” Whitney replied. “A suggestive name, isn't it? Sailors have a curious dread of the place. I don't know why. Some superstition —”

“Can't see it,” remarked Rainsford, trying to peer through the dank tropical night that was palpable as it pressed its thick warm blackness in upon the yacht.

“You've good eyes,” said Whitney, with a laugh, “and I've seen you pick off a moose moving in the brown fall bush at four hundred yards, but even you can't see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”

“Nor four yards,” admitted Rainsford. “Ugh! It's like moist black velvet.”

“It will be light enough in Rio,” promised Whitney. “We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting.”

“The best sport in the world,” agreed Rainsford.

“For the hunter,” amended Whitney. “Not for the jaguar.”

“Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. “You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?”

“Perhaps the jaguar does,” observed Whitney.

“Bah! They've no understanding.”

“Even so, I rather think they understand one thing — fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death.”

“Nonsense,” laughed Rainsford. “This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes — the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are hunters.”
 
How do Rainsford and Whitney’s opinions on the jaguar differ?

A
Rainsford doesn’t believe jaguars have feelings
B
Whitney believes the jaguars' emotions matter
C
Rainsford believes the jaguars are intelligent
D
Whitney believes the jaguars lack understanding
Question 14 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). Rainsford and Whitney both indicate they believe the jaguar has emotions, but Rainsford doesn’t believe they have any “understanding.” Rainsford says, “who cares” how the jaguars feel, while Whitney says they do understand fear, so perhaps that should be taken into account.
Question 15

The Most Dangerous Game

“Off there to the right — somewhere — is a large island,” said Whitney. “It's rather a mystery —”

“What island is it?” Rainsford asked.

“The old charts call it ‘Ship-Trap Island’,” Whitney replied. “A suggestive name, isn't it? Sailors have a curious dread of the place. I don't know why. Some superstition —”

“Can't see it,” remarked Rainsford, trying to peer through the dank tropical night that was palpable as it pressed its thick warm blackness in upon the yacht.

“You've good eyes,” said Whitney, with a laugh, “and I've seen you pick off a moose moving in the brown fall bush at four hundred yards, but even you can't see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”

“Nor four yards,” admitted Rainsford. “Ugh! It's like moist black velvet.”

“It will be light enough in Rio,” promised Whitney. “We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting.”

“The best sport in the world,” agreed Rainsford.

“For the hunter,” amended Whitney. “Not for the jaguar.”

“Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. “You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?”

“Perhaps the jaguar does,” observed Whitney.

“Bah! They've no understanding.”

“Even so, I rather think they understand one thing — fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death.”

“Nonsense,” laughed Rainsford. “This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes — the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are hunters.”
 
The description of the island creates a sense of:

A
Astonishment
B
Bewilderment
C
Foreboding
D
Serenity
Question 15 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). Foreboding is a fearful apprehension or a feeling that something bad will happen. With the name Ship-Trap Island and the comment about “a curious dread of the place,” there is a sense that something bad may happen near this island.
Question 16

The Most Dangerous Game

“Off there to the right — somewhere — is a large island,” said Whitney. “It's rather a mystery —”

“What island is it?” Rainsford asked.

“The old charts call it ‘Ship-Trap Island’,” Whitney replied. “A suggestive name, isn't it? Sailors have a curious dread of the place. I don't know why. Some superstition —”

“Can't see it,” remarked Rainsford, trying to peer through the dank tropical night that was palpable as it pressed its thick warm blackness in upon the yacht.

“You've good eyes,” said Whitney, with a laugh, “and I've seen you pick off a moose moving in the brown fall bush at four hundred yards, but even you can't see four miles or so through a moonless Caribbean night.”

“Nor four yards,” admitted Rainsford. “Ugh! It's like moist black velvet.”

“It will be light enough in Rio,” promised Whitney. “We should make it in a few days. I hope the jaguar guns have come from Purdey's. We should have some good hunting up the Amazon. Great sport, hunting.”

“The best sport in the world,” agreed Rainsford.

“For the hunter,” amended Whitney. “Not for the jaguar.”

“Don't talk rot, Whitney," said Rainsford. “You're a big-game hunter, not a philosopher. Who cares how a jaguar feels?”

“Perhaps the jaguar does,” observed Whitney.

“Bah! They've no understanding.”

“Even so, I rather think they understand one thing — fear. The fear of pain and the fear of death.”

“Nonsense,” laughed Rainsford. “This hot weather is making you soft, Whitney. Be a realist. The world is made up of two classes — the hunters and the huntees. Luckily, you and I are hunters.”
 
Which of the following best describes Rainsford’s character?

A
Realistic and blunt
B
Bullying and aggressive
C
Sarcastic and jaded
D
Philosophical and practical
Question 16 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). Rainsford tells Whitney to be “a realist.” This is obviously what he thinks is the best way to be, and is most likely how he himself views the world. He is very direct, or blunt, in how he speaks to Whitney, correcting him and offering his own opinions. He is not bullying Whitney, and Whitney is the one who is more philosophical and practical.
Question 17

Wu Mei

Our view of early history blends written records with legendary stories. Over the ages, documents are lost, tales are told, and new legends emerge. The story of Wu Mei is one such tale. Wu Mei grew up in China in the 1600s, training hard in martial arts in the Shaolin temple. Because of her dedication and skill, Mei eventually became one of the Five Elders of the temple, a guiding figure for others who trained there. Sadly, the temple was destroyed in a war during the Qing Dynasty. Mei escaped, however, and went on to develop a new form of martial arts that could be used by common people after only a short amount of training.

According to legend, Mei developed the new martial arts form after meeting a beautiful young girl who was being forced to marry a bandit. Mei trained the young girl to defend herself so she could not be forced to marry him. Because they had little time to train and because they needed to do it in secret, Mei created a style of martial arts that was useful to smaller or weaker fighters. This form of fighting became known as Wing Chun.

To further improve the fighting style, Mei drew inspiration from the movements of the animals she encountered in daily life. She especially favored the crane's graceful and stealthy motions. By basing her fighting style on animals that were common in all of China, Mei made her fighting technique easy to learn for the masses. Mei's fighting style remains in use even today. Mei's powerful martial arts skills and her understanding of others' struggles let her have a lasting impact in the martial arts world.
 
Which would make the best title for this selection?

A
Martial Arts in China during the Qing Dynasty
B
A Brief History of Shaolin Temples
C
Wu Mei: Martial Arts Reaches the Masses
D
Wu Mei: How Legends Become Reality
Question 17 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The passage summarizes events in Wu Mei’s life that led her to create the Wing Chun style of martial arts, which was meant to be easy for common people to learn. Answer (A) is incorrect because the passage does not examine any other martial arts forms in China at the time. Answer (B) is incorrect because the selection only mentions the Shaolin Temple; it does not offer a history of such temples. Answer (D) would not make the best title because the passage does not discuss the differences between the legends of Wu Mei and her real life.
Question 18

Wu Mei

Our view of early history blends written records with legendary stories. Over the ages, documents are lost, tales are told, and new legends emerge. The story of Wu Mei is one such tale. Wu Mei grew up in China in the 1600s, training hard in martial arts in the Shaolin temple. Because of her dedication and skill, Mei eventually became one of the Five Elders of the temple, a guiding figure for others who trained there. Sadly, the temple was destroyed in a war during the Qing Dynasty. Mei escaped, however, and went on to develop a new form of martial arts that could be used by common people after only a short amount of training.

According to legend, Mei developed the new martial arts form after meeting a beautiful young girl who was being forced to marry a bandit. Mei trained the young girl to defend herself so she could not be forced to marry him. Because they had little time to train and because they needed to do it in secret, Mei created a style of martial arts that was useful to smaller or weaker fighters. This form of fighting became known as Wing Chun.

To further improve the fighting style, Mei drew inspiration from the movements of the animals she encountered in daily life. She especially favored the crane's graceful and stealthy motions. By basing her fighting style on animals that were common in all of China, Mei made her fighting technique easy to learn for the masses. Mei's fighting style remains in use even today. Mei's powerful martial arts skills and her understanding of others' struggles let her have a lasting impact in the martial arts world.
 
Which event came last?

A
The Shaolin Temple was destroyed.
B
Mei created a style of martial arts for smaller, weaker fighters.
C
Mei became one of the temple’s Five Elders.
D
Mei trained a young girl to defend herself.
Question 18 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). Wu Mei was already one of the Shaolin Temple’s Five Elders when the temple was destroyed. Her experience training a young girl to defend herself is what led to the creation of the Wing Chung style.
Question 19

Wu Mei

Our view of early history blends written records with legendary stories. Over the ages, documents are lost, tales are told, and new legends emerge. The story of Wu Mei is one such tale. Wu Mei grew up in China in the 1600s, training hard in martial arts in the Shaolin temple. Because of her dedication and skill, Mei eventually became one of the Five Elders of the temple, a guiding figure for others who trained there. Sadly, the temple was destroyed in a war during the Qing Dynasty. Mei escaped, however, and went on to develop a new form of martial arts that could be used by common people after only a short amount of training.

According to legend, Mei developed the new martial arts form after meeting a beautiful young girl who was being forced to marry a bandit. Mei trained the young girl to defend herself so she could not be forced to marry him. Because they had little time to train and because they needed to do it in secret, Mei created a style of martial arts that was useful to smaller or weaker fighters. This form of fighting became known as Wing Chun.

To further improve the fighting style, Mei drew inspiration from the movements of the animals she encountered in daily life. She especially favored the crane's graceful and stealthy motions. By basing her fighting style on animals that were common in all of China, Mei made her fighting technique easy to learn for the masses. Mei's fighting style remains in use even today. Mei's powerful martial arts skills and her understanding of others' struggles let her have a lasting impact in the martial arts world.
 
As it is used in the passage, the word “Elders” most nearly means:

A
Old people living in the Shaolin Temple
B
Experts in Wu Mei’s fighting style
C
The leaders of the Shaolin Temple
D
Leaders in China during the Qing Dynasty
Question 19 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The passage explains that as one of the five Elders, Wu Mei was a “guiding figure” for others who trained there, making her something of a leader. Answer (A) is incorrect because the mention of “Five Elders” does not refer to elderly people. Answer (B) is illogical; Wu Mei had not developed her fighting style when she was at the Shaolin Temple, so there could be no experts in it. Answer (D) cannot be correct, since the term “Five Elders” referred to people in the temple, not all over China.
Question 20

Wu Mei

Our view of early history blends written records with legendary stories. Over the ages, documents are lost, tales are told, and new legends emerge. The story of Wu Mei is one such tale. Wu Mei grew up in China in the 1600s, training hard in martial arts in the Shaolin temple. Because of her dedication and skill, Mei eventually became one of the Five Elders of the temple, a guiding figure for others who trained there. Sadly, the temple was destroyed in a war during the Qing Dynasty. Mei escaped, however, and went on to develop a new form of martial arts that could be used by common people after only a short amount of training.

According to legend, Mei developed the new martial arts form after meeting a beautiful young girl who was being forced to marry a bandit. Mei trained the young girl to defend herself so she could not be forced to marry him. Because they had little time to train and because they needed to do it in secret, Mei created a style of martial arts that was useful to smaller or weaker fighters. This form of fighting became known as Wing Chun.

To further improve the fighting style, Mei drew inspiration from the movements of the animals she encountered in daily life. She especially favored the crane's graceful and stealthy motions. By basing her fighting style on animals that were common in all of China, Mei made her fighting technique easy to learn for the masses. Mei's fighting style remains in use even today. Mei's powerful martial arts skills and her understanding of others' struggles let her have a lasting impact in the martial arts world.
 
Why did Wu Mei base her fighting style on the movements of animals from around China?

A
She wanted to help her students feel connected with nature.
B
She believed the animals’ style of movement had enabled them to survive among humans.
C
The Qing Dynasty was a time of great reverence for animals in China.
D
She wanted her fighting style to appeal to people all over China.
Question 20 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). The selection states, “By basing her fighting style on animals that were common in all of China, Mei made her fighting technique easy to learn for the masses.” In other words, her style was easy to learn because the movements were based on animals that most people were likely to recognize.
Question 21

Wu Mei

Our view of early history blends written records with legendary stories. Over the ages, documents are lost, tales are told, and new legends emerge. The story of Wu Mei is one such tale. Wu Mei grew up in China in the 1600s, training hard in martial arts in the Shaolin temple. Because of her dedication and skill, Mei eventually became one of the Five Elders of the temple, a guiding figure for others who trained there. Sadly, the temple was destroyed in a war during the Qing Dynasty. Mei escaped, however, and went on to develop a new form of martial arts that could be used by common people after only a short amount of training.

According to legend, Mei developed the new martial arts form after meeting a beautiful young girl who was being forced to marry a bandit. Mei trained the young girl to defend herself so she could not be forced to marry him. Because they had little time to train and because they needed to do it in secret, Mei created a style of martial arts that was useful to smaller or weaker fighters. This form of fighting became known as Wing Chun.

To further improve the fighting style, Mei drew inspiration from the movements of the animals she encountered in daily life. She especially favored the crane's graceful and stealthy motions. By basing her fighting style on animals that were common in all of China, Mei made her fighting technique easy to learn for the masses. Mei's fighting style remains in use even today. Mei's powerful martial arts skills and her understanding of others' struggles let her have a lasting impact in the martial arts world.
 
Which of the following statements is false?

A
We don’t know if Wing Chun was really inspired by Mei training a young girl.
B
Wing Chun differs from other forms of martial arts because it was designed for the small, weak individuals, not just the strong and athletic.
C
Wing Chun is based on the movements of one animal: the crane, because of its smooth, stealthy motions.
D
Mei lived during the Qing Dynasty.
Question 21 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). While the passage does mention cranes as an inspiration for Wing Chun, it states that Mei took inspiration from more than one animal. We know (A) is true because the passage says “According to legend” before telling the story about the young girl. (B) is true based on how Wing Chun is described throughout the passage. (D) is true because it is stated in the first paragraph.
Question 22

Ludwig van Beethoven

Most people have heard of the incredible composer Ludwig van Beethoven, a legendary German musician from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Few know, however, that this musical genius began going deaf in his late twenties.

Beethoven lamented over the injustice of life, that he — a talented composer and musician — could lose his hearing. The earliest record of Beethoven writing about this imparity is from an 1801 letter to his friends, when Beethoven was just 31 years old. Despite his slowly declining sense of hearing, he bravely decided to continue in his career.

By middle age, he had gone almost completely deaf; he had also lost his mother, brother, and father. He had seen his fair share of hardships, between these recent losses, earlier abuse from his alcoholic father, financial difficulty, and, of course, the loss of his most precious sense. He had a multitude of disastrous concerts in which he could not hear what he was playing. He was forced to make the decision to quit performing and only compose. The odds of his life were stacked against him; how is it that he remains one of the most famed musical intellectuals of all time?

Surprisingly, Beethoven’s entire “heroic period” — the time when he composed many of his greatest works — occurred while he was deaf. His most famous works were written in the last ten years of his life, during his “late period”; this included his notable Ninth (and final) Symphony, an act of genius that was unparalleled in the musical world. This man wrote songs, sonatas, and symphonies that he himself would never hear.

Perhaps it is a great tragedy that this genius man lost his hearing, or perhaps it is a triumph. Beethoven embodies a strength unseen in anyone else and a talent that he may have never truly understood. His deafness serves as a testament to his gift; despite his many sufferings, he achieved things of which others could only dream.
 
The main purpose of this passage is:

A
To list Beethoven’s many notable accomplishments.
B
To explain how Beethoven’s difficulties inhibited him from achieving great things in the end of his life.
C
To highlight how Beethoven composed great music despite his deafness.
D
To show how the relationship between Beethoven and his abusive, alcoholic father influenced his work.
Question 22 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The passage focuses on the trials of Beethoven’s deafness while showing how he managed to achieve greatness anyway. Answer (A) is incorrect because, while several of Beethoven’s accomplishments are mentioned, there are entire paragraphs dedicated to his deafness. Answer (B) is incorrect because of his clear achievements despite his difficulties. Answer (D) is incorrect because Beethoven’s relationship with his father is mentioned only briefly.
Question 23

Ludwig van Beethoven

Most people have heard of the incredible composer Ludwig van Beethoven, a legendary German musician from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Few know, however, that this musical genius began going deaf in his late twenties.

Beethoven lamented over the injustice of life, that he — a talented composer and musician — could lose his hearing. The earliest record of Beethoven writing about this imparity is from an 1801 letter to his friends, when Beethoven was just 31 years old. Despite his slowly declining sense of hearing, he bravely decided to continue in his career.

By middle age, he had gone almost completely deaf; he had also lost his mother, brother, and father. He had seen his fair share of hardships, between these recent losses, earlier abuse from his alcoholic father, financial difficulty, and, of course, the loss of his most precious sense. He had a multitude of disastrous concerts in which he could not hear what he was playing. He was forced to make the decision to quit performing and only compose. The odds of his life were stacked against him; how is it that he remains one of the most famed musical intellectuals of all time?

Surprisingly, Beethoven’s entire “heroic period” — the time when he composed many of his greatest works — occurred while he was deaf. His most famous works were written in the last ten years of his life, during his “late period”; this included his notable Ninth (and final) Symphony, an act of genius that was unparalleled in the musical world. This man wrote songs, sonatas, and symphonies that he himself would never hear.

Perhaps it is a great tragedy that this genius man lost his hearing, or perhaps it is a triumph. Beethoven embodies a strength unseen in anyone else and a talent that he may have never truly understood. His deafness serves as a testament to his gift; despite his many sufferings, he achieved things of which others could only dream.
 
As it is used in the passage, what does the word “embodies” mean?

A
To provide with a body
B
To organize or incorporate
C
To embrace
D
To express or exemplify
Question 23 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). Beethoven expresses or provides an example of strength unseen in others.
Question 24

Ludwig van Beethoven

Most people have heard of the incredible composer Ludwig van Beethoven, a legendary German musician from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Few know, however, that this musical genius began going deaf in his late twenties.

Beethoven lamented over the injustice of life, that he — a talented composer and musician — could lose his hearing. The earliest record of Beethoven writing about this imparity is from an 1801 letter to his friends, when Beethoven was just 31 years old. Despite his slowly declining sense of hearing, he bravely decided to continue in his career.

By middle age, he had gone almost completely deaf; he had also lost his mother, brother, and father. He had seen his fair share of hardships, between these recent losses, earlier abuse from his alcoholic father, financial difficulty, and, of course, the loss of his most precious sense. He had a multitude of disastrous concerts in which he could not hear what he was playing. He was forced to make the decision to quit performing and only compose. The odds of his life were stacked against him; how is it that he remains one of the most famed musical intellectuals of all time?

Surprisingly, Beethoven’s entire “heroic period” — the time when he composed many of his greatest works — occurred while he was deaf. His most famous works were written in the last ten years of his life, during his “late period”; this included his notable Ninth (and final) Symphony, an act of genius that was unparalleled in the musical world. This man wrote songs, sonatas, and symphonies that he himself would never hear.

Perhaps it is a great tragedy that this genius man lost his hearing, or perhaps it is a triumph. Beethoven embodies a strength unseen in anyone else and a talent that he may have never truly understood. His deafness serves as a testament to his gift; despite his many sufferings, he achieved things of which others could only dream.
 
Which of the following events occurred last?

A
Beethoven wrote to his friends complaining of his hearing loss.
B
Beethoven composed his Ninth Symphony.
C
Beethoven had his “heroic period.”
D
Beethoven completely lost his hearing.
Question 24 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The Ninth Symphony was Beethoven’s last symphony, and he composed it during his “late period,” which came in the last ten years of his life — the heroic period (C) came before this. Events (A) and (B) preceded (C) and (D), because Beethoven was already completely deaf by then.
Question 25

Ludwig van Beethoven

Most people have heard of the incredible composer Ludwig van Beethoven, a legendary German musician from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Few know, however, that this musical genius began going deaf in his late twenties.

Beethoven lamented over the injustice of life, that he — a talented composer and musician — could lose his hearing. The earliest record of Beethoven writing about this imparity is from an 1801 letter to his friends, when Beethoven was just 31 years old. Despite his slowly declining sense of hearing, he bravely decided to continue in his career.

By middle age, he had gone almost completely deaf; he had also lost his mother, brother, and father. He had seen his fair share of hardships, between these recent losses, earlier abuse from his alcoholic father, financial difficulty, and, of course, the loss of his most precious sense. He had a multitude of disastrous concerts in which he could not hear what he was playing. He was forced to make the decision to quit performing and only compose. The odds of his life were stacked against him; how is it that he remains one of the most famed musical intellectuals of all time?

Surprisingly, Beethoven’s entire “heroic period” — the time when he composed many of his greatest works — occurred while he was deaf. His most famous works were written in the last ten years of his life, during his “late period”; this included his notable Ninth (and final) Symphony, an act of genius that was unparalleled in the musical world. This man wrote songs, sonatas, and symphonies that he himself would never hear.

Perhaps it is a great tragedy that this genius man lost his hearing, or perhaps it is a triumph. Beethoven embodies a strength unseen in anyone else and a talent that he may have never truly understood. His deafness serves as a testament to his gift; despite his many sufferings, he achieved things of which others could only dream.
 
Which sentence shows us how Beethoven felt about his hearing loss?

A
Beethoven lamented over the injustice of life, that he — a talented composer and musician — could lose his hearing.
B
He had a multitude of disastrous concerts in which he could not hear what he was playing.
C
He was forced to make the decision to quit performing and only compose.
D
This man wrote songs, sonatas, and symphonies that he himself would never hear.
Question 25 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). It tells us that Beethoven “lamented over the injustice,” meaning he complained that it was unfair he was losing his hearing. Answers (B), (C), and (D) are statements of fact; although the reader might guess how Beethoven felt in those scenarios, only (A) says forthright.
Question 26

Ludwig van Beethoven

Most people have heard of the incredible composer Ludwig van Beethoven, a legendary German musician from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Few know, however, that this musical genius began going deaf in his late twenties.

Beethoven lamented over the injustice of life, that he — a talented composer and musician — could lose his hearing. The earliest record of Beethoven writing about this imparity is from an 1801 letter to his friends, when Beethoven was just 31 years old. Despite his slowly declining sense of hearing, he bravely decided to continue in his career.

By middle age, he had gone almost completely deaf; he had also lost his mother, brother, and father. He had seen his fair share of hardships, between these recent losses, earlier abuse from his alcoholic father, financial difficulty, and, of course, the loss of his most precious sense. He had a multitude of disastrous concerts in which he could not hear what he was playing. He was forced to make the decision to quit performing and only compose. The odds of his life were stacked against him; how is it that he remains one of the most famed musical intellectuals of all time?

Surprisingly, Beethoven’s entire “heroic period” — the time when he composed many of his greatest works — occurred while he was deaf. His most famous works were written in the last ten years of his life, during his “late period”; this included his notable Ninth (and final) Symphony, an act of genius that was unparalleled in the musical world. This man wrote songs, sonatas, and symphonies that he himself would never hear.

Perhaps it is a great tragedy that this genius man lost his hearing, or perhaps it is a triumph. Beethoven embodies a strength unseen in anyone else and a talent that he may have never truly understood. His deafness serves as a testament to his gift; despite his many sufferings, he achieved things of which others could only dream.
 
Which statement is false?

A
Beethoven’s father was an alcoholic.
B
Beethoven was an only child.
C
Beethoven wrote nine symphonies.
D
Beethoven faced financial difficulties.
Question 26 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (B). The passage mentions that Beethoven had a brother who died, meaning he could not have been an only child. Answers (A), (B), and (C) are all facts mentioned in the text.
Question 27

Amelia Earhart

It’s the beginning of the twentieth century. Surely a woman cannot fly across the Atlantic. Three women have already died trying to accomplish the same thing. Flying simply isn’t meant for women.

Amelia Earhart heard statements like these and thought nothing of them. In 1928, barely in her thirties, Earhart began planning to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic. She joined a team with Wilmer Stultz and Louis E. Gordon and embarked on a flight to change history on June 17, 1928. The feat was accomplished in just 21 hours. Earhart was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic!

Why stop there? One record-breaking flight wasn’t enough for Amelia. Now it was time to fly it solo. Only one person in history had done that — and that, of course, was a man.

Earhart and her husband George Putnam planned the flight for her to make history once again. On May 20, 1932, she left Newfoundland, Canada and began a treacherous journey to Paris, France. She faced unfavorable weather and mechanical issues that forced her to land in Ireland, but her journey was still a success. She had done it.

Earhart was awarded the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society by President Hoover, as well as the Distinguished Flying Cross from Congress, something that no woman had ever before received. Her hard work paid off; she was finally recognized for her outstanding courage and determination.

Of course, Amelia did not stop her career there. She continued to break records and make history, reaching the highest altitude ever achieved at the time and being the first to fly solo over the Pacific. After a variety of other “firsts,” she had one final goal: to be the first woman to fly around the world.

Sadly, she never saw the end of her trip around the globe. Communications dropped mid-flight over the Pacific, and despite the largest sea search in history, she was never found. Earhart defied all odds and shattered prejudice as well as flight records, and we shall never let her final flight overshadow all that she had accomplished.
 
Which of the following would be the best title for this passage?

A
21 Hours: Amelia Earhart’s First Flight across the Atlantic
B
Where Is She? The Mysterious Disappearance of Amelia Earhart
C
Amelia Earhart: Shattering Records and Gender Norms
D
Women in Flight: Notable Female Pilots
Question 27 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (C). The passage details Amelia Earhart’s accomplishments, explaining how she went against the expectations for women of that day. Answers (B) and (C) are incorrect because, while these events are mentioned in the passage, they are not the focus. Answer (D) is incorrect because no other notable female pilots are mentioned in this passage.
Question 28

Amelia Earhart

It’s the beginning of the twentieth century. Surely a woman cannot fly across the Atlantic. Three women have already died trying to accomplish the same thing. Flying simply isn’t meant for women.

Amelia Earhart heard statements like these and thought nothing of them. In 1928, barely in her thirties, Earhart began planning to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic. She joined a team with Wilmer Stultz and Louis E. Gordon and embarked on a flight to change history on June 17, 1928. The feat was accomplished in just 21 hours. Earhart was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic!

Why stop there? One record-breaking flight wasn’t enough for Amelia. Now it was time to fly it solo. Only one person in history had done that — and that, of course, was a man.

Earhart and her husband George Putnam planned the flight for her to make history once again. On May 20, 1932, she left Newfoundland, Canada and began a treacherous journey to Paris, France. She faced unfavorable weather and mechanical issues that forced her to land in Ireland, but her journey was still a success. She had done it.

Earhart was awarded the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society by President Hoover, as well as the Distinguished Flying Cross from Congress, something that no woman had ever before received. Her hard work paid off; she was finally recognized for her outstanding courage and determination.

Of course, Amelia did not stop her career there. She continued to break records and make history, reaching the highest altitude ever achieved at the time and being the first to fly solo over the Pacific. After a variety of other “firsts,” she had one final goal: to be the first woman to fly around the world.

Sadly, she never saw the end of her trip around the globe. Communications dropped mid-flight over the Pacific, and despite the largest sea search in history, she was never found. Earhart defied all odds and shattered prejudice as well as flight records, and we shall never let her final flight overshadow all that she had accomplished.
 
Which event came first?

A
Earhart was awarded the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society.
B
Earhart was the first woman to fly across the Pacific.
C
Earhart was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic.
D
Earhart partnered with Wilmer Stultz and Louis E. Gordon.
Question 28 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (D). Earhart partnered with Stultz and Gordon for her first transatlantic flight; she then went on to accomplish (C), (A), and (B) respectively.
Question 29

Amelia Earhart

It’s the beginning of the twentieth century. Surely a woman cannot fly across the Atlantic. Three women have already died trying to accomplish the same thing. Flying simply isn’t meant for women.

Amelia Earhart heard statements like these and thought nothing of them. In 1928, barely in her thirties, Earhart began planning to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic. She joined a team with Wilmer Stultz and Louis E. Gordon and embarked on a flight to change history on June 17, 1928. The feat was accomplished in just 21 hours. Earhart was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic!

Why stop there? One record-breaking flight wasn’t enough for Amelia. Now it was time to fly it solo. Only one person in history had done that — and that, of course, was a man.

Earhart and her husband George Putnam planned the flight for her to make history once again. On May 20, 1932, she left Newfoundland, Canada and began a treacherous journey to Paris, France. She faced unfavorable weather and mechanical issues that forced her to land in Ireland, but her journey was still a success. She had done it.

Earhart was awarded the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society by President Hoover, as well as the Distinguished Flying Cross from Congress, something that no woman had ever before received. Her hard work paid off; she was finally recognized for her outstanding courage and determination.

Of course, Amelia did not stop her career there. She continued to break records and make history, reaching the highest altitude ever achieved at the time and being the first to fly solo over the Pacific. After a variety of other “firsts,” she had one final goal: to be the first woman to fly around the world.

Sadly, she never saw the end of her trip around the globe. Communications dropped mid-flight over the Pacific, and despite the largest sea search in history, she was never found. Earhart defied all odds and shattered prejudice as well as flight records, and we shall never let her final flight overshadow all that she had accomplished.
 
Based on the passage, which word best describes Earhart’s personality?

A
Ambitious
B
Boastful
C
Cheerful
D
Cautious
Question 29 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). Earhart had many goals and was determined to accomplish them all, making her ambitious. Though she received many awards, nothing in the passage hints that she was boastful about her accomplishments. Nothing in the passage describes Earhart as cheerful. Earhart took many risks, so answer (D) is incorrect.
Question 30

Amelia Earhart

It’s the beginning of the twentieth century. Surely a woman cannot fly across the Atlantic. Three women have already died trying to accomplish the same thing. Flying simply isn’t meant for women.

Amelia Earhart heard statements like these and thought nothing of them. In 1928, barely in her thirties, Earhart began planning to be the first woman to fly across the Atlantic. She joined a team with Wilmer Stultz and Louis E. Gordon and embarked on a flight to change history on June 17, 1928. The feat was accomplished in just 21 hours. Earhart was the first woman to fly across the Atlantic!

Why stop there? One record-breaking flight wasn’t enough for Amelia. Now it was time to fly it solo. Only one person in history had done that — and that, of course, was a man.

Earhart and her husband George Putnam planned the flight for her to make history once again. On May 20, 1932, she left Newfoundland, Canada and began a treacherous journey to Paris, France. She faced unfavorable weather and mechanical issues that forced her to land in Ireland, but her journey was still a success. She had done it.

Earhart was awarded the Gold Medal of the National Geographic Society by President Hoover, as well as the Distinguished Flying Cross from Congress, something that no woman had ever before received. Her hard work paid off; she was finally recognized for her outstanding courage and determination.

Of course, Amelia did not stop her career there. She continued to break records and make history, reaching the highest altitude ever achieved at the time and being the first to fly solo over the Pacific. After a variety of other “firsts,” she had one final goal: to be the first woman to fly around the world.

Sadly, she never saw the end of her trip around the globe. Communications dropped mid-flight over the Pacific, and despite the largest sea search in history, she was never found. Earhart defied all odds and shattered prejudice as well as flight records, and we shall never let her final flight overshadow all that she had accomplished.
 
As it is used in the passage, what does the word “odds” mean?

A
Likelihood
B
Expectations
C
The opposite of “evens”
D
Opposition
Question 30 Explanation: 
The correct answer is (A). The word “odds” refers to the ratio of probability, so although the odds meant it was unlikely that Earhart would succeed, she accomplished many of her goals anyway. Expectations and opposition (B & D) could be considered contributing factors to the odds, but they do not define the word itself. Answer (C) refers to odd numbers, which doesn’t apply here.
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